Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Muintir na Tíre's Community Development Officer - A Common Thread

As mentioned in an earlier post I spoke about getting to be the first to explore an archive. Another perk is getting to see common threads, trends in the work an organisation/person, the issues that come up over and over again and how the organisation/person worked.

In Muintir na Tíre one of the common threads throughout its 80 years in existence is the use of Community Development Officers/Community Alert Development Officers. The role has been used to spread the word and work of Muintir na Tíre in the community. The Development Officers formed guilds, community councils and community alert group with the local community. They provided advice and guidance to these and ensured they were informed of any decisions from headquarters.  

In the archive we can see the role of Organisers in the 1950s is to spread the work and word of Muintir na Tíre in communities and to from guilds. There were approximately six organisers employed by Muintir na Tíre during this time. Each week the Organiser had to submit a report to Headquarters with regard to the weeks work and note if a new guild was formed. Below is a repot from O. Reilly who covered Tipperary, Kilkenny, Kerry, Kildare and Meath. These reports give a great insight into the communities that Muintir na Tíre engaged with and the issues that were facing guilds. 


In the 1970s Community Development Officers were employed in the E.E.C. Pilot Project. Funding for the pilot project came from the European Social Fund. The project was focused on training community development workers in rural community work which led to employment opportunities through local enterprise. The project also focused on developing community councils, identifying community needs, organising local resources, linking of local resources to those available at higher levels and seeking to accommodate the local projects within the plans and programmes devised at statutory, regional and national levels of administration/organisation [Tierney p.158]. The Community Development officers advised on the creation of community councils and the identification of the needs and objectives of rural-urban societies. They operated in defined locations and worked closely with community council and provided them with training and a professional approach. A copy of Conditions of Employment for Community development officers can be seen below. They also provided weekly reports which are also in the archive.


In the 1980s there were two types of employee’s in Muintir na Tíre. One of these was the Community Development officer who continued to focus on community development, supporting community councils and creating new councils. Kevin Hickey was employed by both Headquarters and Cork County Federation and his role and achievements in Cork is described below.


The 1980s also saw the creation of Community Alert in rural Ireland in 1985. To help promote Community Alert, Muintir na Tíre employed and continues to employ Community Alert Development Officers who help establish community alert groups in local communities across Ireland. They work closely with An Garda Síochána. The Community Alert Development Officers also completed weekly work reports. Below is an example of a report from the 1990s from Pat Doyle. 



These reports provide a great insight into the development of community alert and the issues facing communities in rural Ireland.

The role of a community development officer to promote the work and word of Muintir na Tíre has been an effective tool for 80 years. This role is one of many common threads in the archive. 

Friday, May 5, 2017

The Muintir na Tíre Interest Group

When the James Hardiman Library was discussing the acquisition of the Muintir na Tíre archive with Tom Fitzgerald, Dr Tony Varley from the School of Political Science and Sociology and the University Librarian, John Cox contacted academics from within and outside NUIG to see what the academic interest, if any, was in the archive.

Numerous letters of support were received regarding the value of the archive and how important the archive was for social, historical, geographical and sociological research purposes. This support came from historians, sociologists, geographers and economists. Such powerful advocacy was very influential in ensuring that the University acquired the archive.

To continue the engagement with the academic supporters who were very enthused about the archive an interest group was established within the university. While the academics wait patiently and with excitement for me to finish appraising, arranging and cataloguing the archive we have invited the academics who are on campus in NUIG and colleagues from Teagasc in Athenry to attend four meetings throughout the period of the project.



We have had two very successful meetings with the academics to date. The first meeting provided the academics with an introduction to the archive and the archival process. We informed them of the various records that are in the collection such as the National Conference material, AGM minutes, financial records, publications, annual returns provided by guilds/community councils and publications.


The second meeting provided a further update on the progress of the arrangement and cataloguing of the collection. I’m still at the arrangement phase as there are approximately 8,217 items in the collection but I am over half way there. They were also informed of some of the other finds in the collection including minutes of meetings of the National Council and National Executive, correspondence with other bodies involved in rural Ireland including IFA, ICA, ICMSA and of course government departments.


One of the main purposes of the interest group and engaging with the academics is to get them thinking about the use of the archive for teaching and research purposes. By informing them of the content of the archive they can start planning the use of the archive for undergraduate and post graduate teaching and research purposes. They might not focus all their research on Muintir na Tíre but they may wish to use some of the archive. They can inform students of the wealth of material in the archive and the possibilities of how this can enhance their research.

By engaging with academics it provides solace to this archivist and indeed the library that the archive will be used and that there is excitement about the archive being made available so that they can start using it. Expectations on when the archive will be available for use does have to be tempered but knowing that your hard work is appreciated and causing excitement does provide me with enthusiasm and enjoyment while continuing the archival process. 

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Muintir na Tíre Limited

Before Muintir na Tíre was founded in 1937 by Canon John Hayes, he established a co-operative society, Muintir na Tíre Limited, in 1931. Muintir na Tíre was an agricultural producers co-operative society for farmers and their labourers.

I have discovered some records relating to Muintir na Tíre Limited during the appraisal and arranging of the Muintir na Tíre archive. This includes the minute books from 1931 – 1937 and some published material.

The minute books of Muintir na Tíre Limited note how Muintir na Tíre Limited was set up, the rules that should be followed, the prices of shares and the title of the organisation. They note the various meetings of the organisation during the years it was active and those who were involved in the organisation. 



The first entry in the first minute book is a circular announcing a meeting on March 4th 1931 “to further consider the matter of setting up an organisation which will embrace every section of Irish Agriculture and avoid political affiliation” announced the intention of setting up an organisation which would act as a parent organisation for all those involved in agriculture. It was decided at this meeting to set up such an organisation, and this became known as Muintir na Tíre Limited.

It was agreed that the association would be registered as a limited liability organisation under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act. Muintir na Tíre Limited was registered with the Register of Friendly Societies on 24th November 1931. To be registered with the Register of Friendly Societies Muintir na Tíre Limited had to produce rules. 


Muintir na Tíre Limited believed in rural self-help. The ideological basis for Muintir na Tíre Limited was the encyclical Rerum Novarum. In this the Pope was calling for greater harmony between the social classes. In Ireland this was seen as the relationship between farmer and labourer. This vision was set out by Reverend Hayes in an address to a meeting of delegates at Commercial Buildings Dublin, 7th May 1931 and published in the below booklet.



Muintir na Tíre Limited agreed the formation of branches in 1934. Rules and regulations governing the formation of branches were established.



The most successful activity of Muintir na Tíre Limited was the development of Rural Weekends. These weekends were a shortened version of Semaine Sociales held in rural France. Rural weekends developed into the Rural Weeks run by Muintir na Tíre.

Muintir na Tíre Limited was a precursor to Muintir na Tíre and many of the ideas of Canon Hayes were developed and tried out in the co-operative society. However, the co-operative was found to be too limiting and by 1937 it ceased being registered with the Registrar of Friendly Societies. Muintir na Tíre was ready to be established to promote rural communities.

While you have to wait until these records are available for research purposes you can have a read of Class, Community and Conflict: the case of Muintir na Tíre Limited by Eoin Devereux published in Tipperary Historical Journal 1995 and Father John Hayes: Founder of Muintir naTíre, People of the Land by Stephen Rynne to find out more about Muintir na Tíre Limited. Hopefully, there will be more records relating to Muintir na Tíre Limited to be discovered. 



Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Martin McGuinness - In Conflict and Peace - From the Archives

The recent stepping away from active political life by Martin McGuinness and from his role as Deputy First Minister, signalled a polemic shift in the political landscape in Northern Ireland, His passing today, aged 66, has further intensified the consideration of his life and role in Northern Ireland, and his journey from conflict to peace, over many decades.

The perhaps unknown role that Martin McGuinness played, over many years, in negotiating a peaceful and sustained end to conflict in Northern Ireland can be seen within the archive of mediator Brendan Duddy. Brendan Duddy was born in Derry on 10 June 1936. He became a businessman in his native city, and by the early 1970s he owned and managed two fish-and-chip shops, one in Beechwood Avenue (Creggan) and another in William Street. Duddy knew Martin McGuinness in the 1960s when McGuinness worked for a supplier company delivering burgers to Duddy's shops - at a time when McGuinness's interest in politics was not yet kindled.
Screenshot of "Walter" material, Duddy Digital Archive, NUI Galway

At the time it would have been impossible for anyone to predict the central roles both men would play over the course of the following decades.

One section of the Duddy papers pertain to a figure known as ‘Walter'. These items, now digitised and available from the Hardiman Library, reveal the extent of efforts by "Walter"  - the active code-name for Martin McGuinness - and particularly his and Duddy's period of close co-operation in 1993. The files include detailed draft and final correspondence and memoranda sent by Brendan Duddy to McGuinness, which show the level of tense and prolonged discussions regarding the Peace Process of the early 1990s and the later Good Friday Agreement of 1998. The files also include other items such as relevant newspaper cuttings focusing on McGuinness.

Telex from Duddy to McGuinness, 1999

Examples include a dossier of three letters from Brendan Duddy to Martin McGuinness, previously sent 21 March - 19 June 1999, copied by telefax to an unidentified recipient in September 1999, detailing the central role and importance played by McGuinness in peace talks. As key mediator in this long process, Duddy, here codenamed as “June”, writes to McGuinness, stating “The War is indeed over and I sincerely hope you can deliver the peace.”. Further letters from Duddy to McGuiness discuss the problematic process of decommissioning of weapons and as recent as June 2006, a letter from Brendan urges McGuinness to “keep driving the Peace Process forward as you have been doing over the last twenty years.” (pol35_585)

Typescript of letter from Duddy to McGuiness, 1999

The Duddy archive offers an indispensable account of understanding and of previously unknown information about the arduous and lengthy and also at times unsuccessful attempts at stabilising peace in Norther Ireland over nearly forty years. The role of Martin McGuinness in this process can be understood in a broader capacity as this archive is digitally available:

https://digital.library.nuigalway.ie/islandora/object/nuigalway%3Aduddy

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Rare Coal Mining Archive Donated to NUI Galway


On Tuesday, February 28th 2017 members of the Flynn family visited NUI Galway to view the archive of Flynn and Lehany Coal Mines Limited.  The Flynn family very generously donated the archive to the University. The company was established in 1949. Its archive, one of a very small number on mining in Ireland, is a significant source of information about the mining industry, State energy policy, the operation of the company and the social and economic history of the mines at Arigna.
Miners at Altygowlan

The Flynn and Lehany company operated the coal mine of Glackaundareagh, Altygowlan, in the central part of the Kilronan mountain in Co. Roscommon from its foundation in 1949, and subsequently at Gubbarudda.The company worked on contracts with hospitals and other public buildings through the 1950s, and it was a supplier to the coal-burning ESB power station atArigna after that station was built in 1958. The power station closed in 1989 and the site is now a quarry operated by Hillstreet Quarries Ltd.  

The company operated at a time of great social change in rural Ireland, including rural electrification and themodernisation of Irish industry through the 1960s and 1970s. As the record of a commercial mining company in Ireland in the later twentieth century this collection is unique, and offers unparalleled insights into production processes, as well as financial management and the impact of the industry on the locality. There are only two other collections, both housed at the National Library of Ireland, relating to coal mining in Ireland and each of those relates to the nineteenth century. This archive is also of particular value in its inclusion of the mine owner’s experience. 

Ann, Laura and Mary Flynn
The archive itself consists of a very fullrecord of the industry, covering the establishment of the company, as well as material relating to production, personnel and distribution. There are reports and correspondence with the various regulatory bodies associated with mineral rights, as well as technical manuals for the machinery used in the plant. There is also material relating to the Hewitson andLawder estates in the Arigna area. It includes details of lands purchased by the Flynn family from the estates under the auspices of the Irish Land Commission, some as early as the 1890s. Other highlights are records of tonnage, giving amounts mined per employee, and a letter from the company and workforce to John Hume making a donation to the Bloody Sunday Appeal Fund.

Monica Colum
Fr. Tomás Flynn and Denis Flynn have acted on behalf of the Flynn family in generously donating the archive to NUI Galway. They are first cousins whose fathers, Thomas and Michael Flynn, were involved in establishing the company. Denis Flynn is Managing Director of Hillstreet Quarries Ltd and Fr Tomás Flynn is Parish Priest in Drumcong, Co. Leitrim, and author of a recently published book titled Thomas J. Devine and The Election of the Snows: The North Roscommon By-Election of 1917. 

The collection was formally handed over by the Flynn family to NUI Galway at yesterday's event in the University.  

Dr. Jim Browne, President of NUI Galway, commented: “NUI Galway values its archival collections as a major resource for the scholars of today and tomorrow. The donation of the Flynn and Lehany coal mining archive represents a very significant addition to our collections, and the University is much indebted to the Flynn family”. 

Fr Tomás Flynn observed: “Our family is delighted that NUI Galway will be the home of the Flynn and Lehany Archive and that this collection will be used for educational purposes.”

John Cox, University Librarian at NUI Galway, noted that “The Flynn and Lehany archive adds to the regional coverage of our collections and is of great value given the enduring interest in the Arigna mines. It sits well with the John McGahern archive in particular.” 

This wonderful archive has been listed and is available to view in the Archives and Special Collections Room, Hardiman Research Building, NUIG. 

Laura and Andrew Flynn with Mary McPartlan

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Publications Galore – Muintir na Tíre publications

One of the greatest perks of being an archivist is being the first to explore an archive for the first time. You get to look at long forgotten papers, photographs and publications that have not been looked at or thought about in a very long time by the creating organisation or individual. When you come upon a discovery that helps you better understand how the organisation worked, sheds more light on a certain subject or provides you with new evidence your excitement builds and you become engrossed in that file, letter or note. It takes a lot to pull yourself out of that discovery so that you can get to the next discovery in the collection.

A wonderful discovery in the Muintir na Tíre collection is the number of publications Muintir na Tíre produced. I have discovered over 150 so far. They published a great many publications relating to community development, sociology, Muintir na Tíre itself, improving rural Ireland and Canon Hayes.

Their standard bearer publications were Landmark a monthly magazine published from 1944 – 1973 and Rural Ireland an annual published from 1941 to 1972. Both of these contain a wealth of information on Muintir na Tíre, guilds/community councils and on the many issues facing Ireland. A future blog will look at these in depth.

The other publications of booklets and information sheets that Muintir na Tíre published contain a wealth of information for the guilds/community councils and for the local communities. They published booklets focusing on issues on community development by leading authorities in their field.


The Community’s Industry by George F. Thomason discusses how guilds can develop industry or entice industry to their community. Thomason was a former Chair of Industrial Relations in Cardiff University and was very interested in the work of Muintir na Tíre in the 1960s.



The Community as a Social System for Action Programmes by John J Scully discusses how information regarding new farming techniques and methods of operation might be disseminated to the everyday farmers in the shortest possible time. Scully as working in the Department of Agriculture in 1963 when this booklet was published.



       
Booklets such as Production of Plays for Rural Dramatic Groups provided advice to guilds on how to select a play, produce a play, and stage a play, on acting and on costumes and make-up. Guilds were very active in the Amateur Theatre Movement in Ireland and this booklet would have helped in improving the drama group’s productions. 











The Parish Halls booklet focuses on the use of parish halls in the rural community and gives advice on Trusteeship, Insurance, grants available and entertainment tax. 

         
Muintir na Tíre also published booklets relating to itself and the running of guilds or community councils.



One of these Muintir na Tíre Guide provides information on the structure of Muintir na Tíre parish guilds and councils, county and provincial structures and notes for parish councils and officers. It provides guidance on how the various entities should run.
They also used their publications for promotion of Muintir na Tíre as a movement and organisation. An example is Presenting Muintir na Tíre which provides information on Muintir na Tíre with a focus on the community and the social value of neighbourliness that they endorsed.

These are just some samples of the publications that Muintir na Tíre produced. These and many more will be available for consultation once the collection has been arranged and catalogued. 

Thursday, February 23, 2017

SEMINAR - Archives in Teaching: New Pedagogies and Practice


The James Hardiman Library presents:

Archives in Teaching: New Pedagogies and Practice

2 March 2017
Venue: Room G011, Hardiman Research Building


2.15pm - Welcome and Introduction

2.30pm Panel 1 - Archives in Teaching and Learning: New Encounters
Chair and Respondent: Dr. Verena Commins (Irish Studies)
               - Exploring Archives as part of Second Level Teaching – Dr. Paul Flynn and James Shovlin
2.50pm:  - Teaching the Exhibition: 'Yeats and the West in the World'– Dr. Adrian Paterson

Q & A

BREAK

3.30pm Keynote Panel


Post-Fact, Post-Truth . . . Post-Archive? The Place of Repositories in the New Misinformation Age

Dr. Nessa Cronin (Irish Studies)
Prof. Lionel Pilkington (English)
Prof. Iain MacLaren (CELT)
Respondent and Chair – Dr. Sarah-Anne Buckley (History)

5pm - Close
To Register attendance, please see the following Eventbrite page for details:
https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/archives-in-teaching-new-pedagogies-and-practice-tickets-32293669234

Monday, January 30, 2017

John Hurt and the Gate Theatre - From the Archives



John Hurt
The late John Hurt was one of the most celebrated and versatile actors of his generation. With a career that spanned over four decades on stage as well as screen, the British-born Hurt leaves a legacy of diverse and identifiable roles that speak to new generations. A character actor of rare an immense talent, Hurt brought his range of abilities to Dublin’s Gate Theatre on numerous occasions. The Gate Theatre Digital Archive, now available for research at the Hardiman Library, NUI Galway, documents Hurt’s performances on the Gate stage.

Hurt’s career at the Gate began in 1992 with a role of “Count Mushroom” in Brian Friel’s play The London Vertigo. Towards the end of the 1990s, Hurt would continue his association with the Gate Theatre and its director Michael Colgan through the work of Samuel Beckett. Hurt would play the eponymous role in Krapp’s Last Tape, written by Samuel Beckett and directed by Robin Lefévre at the Barbican Centre, London, as part of the Gate Beckett Festival. Hurt would revive the role at London’s Ambassador Theatre in a Gate production in January 2000, before finally bringing the role to Dublin’s Gate stage in September 2001, to great critical acclaim.


John Hurt in Gate production at Gielgud Theatre, London
 Hurt would return to the Gate to again take the lead in a play by another major playwright long associated with the Gate – Brian Friel. Hurt would play Andrey Prozorov  alongside Penelope Wilton as Sonya Screbriakova, in Friel’s Afterplay, part of “Two Plays After”, which explored much of Friel’s interest in the plays and characters of Russian playwright Anton Chekhov.

Hurt take to the Gate stage on two other occasions, in April 2006 and in November 2011, on both occasions to revisit what is now perhaps the definitive performance of Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, directed by Michael Colgan.

The Gate Digital Archive contains a digitised video recording of Hurt in the role of Krapp at the Gate in April 2006, which is one of the most valuable records of Hurt’s stage career. It also includes nearly two hundred photographs, over one thousand press cuttings, stage management files, lighting designs, vast amounts of programmes, posters and other records from Hurt’s time at the Gate. In a fitting twist, as Hurt is so associated with the role of Krapp, an ageing man who listens to tapes of his younger voice recorded from decades previously, so too is Hurt’s infamous voice, deeply expressive face and his unique acting style now also preserved for future generations.

Read more on the Gate Theatre Digital Archive at NUI Galway.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Muintir na Tíre archive donated to NUI Galway

Muintir na Tíre has recently donated its archive to NUI Galway.  Muintir na Tíre is one of the most important national associations for the promotion of community development in Ireland. It was founded in 1937 by Canon John Hayes, in Tipperary (a future blog will focus on Canon Hayes). Through its core principles of neighbourliness, self-help and self-reliance, Muintir na Tíre has promoted and supported the concept of active community participation and championed the idea of community development in both Ireland and Europe.

This is a very significant archive of an organisation which from its beginnings sought to revitalise local communities in rural Ireland and foster and develop a community spirit from the 1930s to the present day.

This substantial archive consisting of 162 boxes and approximately 8,217 items was transferred to the James Hardiman Library in December of 2016. The archive consists of paper files, publications, photographs, loose documents, floppy disks, VHS tapes, cassette tapes, vinyl and bound volumes.

The archive came from the headquarters of Muintir na Tíre, Canon Hayes House, Tipperary. The archive was stored in banker’s boxes which were arranged by Muintir via two projects in 2010 and 2015 an example below: 


and in shelves like the picture below: 


The material that was selected from the shelves were transferred to us in large boxes as shown below:


I have been hired to review, arrange and catalogue the archive. I being Fiona Kearney a qualified archivist and records manager. I began researching Muintir na Tíre by reading Stephen Rynne’s “Father John Hayes: founder of Muintir na Tíre, People of the Land”, Mark Tierney’s “The Story of Muintir na Tíre 1931-2001 – the Frist Seventy Years” and various articles and theses written on Muintir na Tíre. This has given me a good understanding of the organisation and the work that it did throughout its history. A search of our collection can be seen here.

I have already begun opening the boxes to explore the wonders of the collection. I am currently identifying what the files contain so that I can begin to arrange the collection. This phase also involves some conservation work where I am removing rusty staples and paper clips and replacing them with plastic paper clips which do not damage the paper.       


An example of a completed file and a file that has rusty paperclips and staples.     

I am replacing the folders with acid free ones. I am also identifying any records that need further conservation work or which will need to be copied such as thermal paper, predominantly fax paper.

The process of archiving a collection from receipt to discoverability and availability to researchers takes a considerable time. I have fifteen months to complete this project. The end result will look like this.                                                                                                                                                                                                  


I hope you will join me on my journey of archiving the collection where I will provide monthly updates on the project.  

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

'Archives in Research' Seminar and Book Launch - 2 Feb 2017


Archives in Research – Methods, Practice, Outcomes

2 February 2017

Venue: G010 - Moore Institute, Hardiman Research Building

The Archives service of the James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway are hosting a half-day seminar on the theme of 'Archives in Research'. The seminar will feature expert speakers in various academic fields who will showcase new research projects which are based on innovative use of archival collections. The seminar will focus on a range of themes, including community and publicly-sourced records of the revolutionary period in the West of Ireland which are being digitised and being made publicly available online. Other areas addressed will be an NUI-funded project centred on creating digital access to historic traditional Irish musical scores, Irish language manuscripts and the research of the context of their collection.

A keynote paper will be delivered by Professor Frank Shovlin, Director of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool. The paper will  detail the experiences of Prof. Shovlin's study of the literary archive of celebrated writer John McGahern and the influence that archive has had on his research.

Completing the day, Dr. John Kenny (Discipline of English, NUI Galway) will launch the new book Touchstones: John McGahern's Classical Style by Professor Shovlin.

The event is free and all are welcome to attend.

Schedule:

3pm  - Welcome and introduction  - Niall McSweeney
            (Head of Research and Learning, Hardiman Library)

3.05pm  - Chair: Kieran Hoare, Archivist (Hardiman Library)

3.10pm - Dr. Conor McNamara (History) Chronicling the familial experience of the Irish                                    revolution: digitising the Cleary Papers

3.30pm - Dr. Deirdre Ni Chonghaile (NUI Fellow in Irish/Celtic Studies) The Rev. Daniel J. Murphy Collection: Reconfiguring the Cultural History of Irish-speakers in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

3.50 – 4.00pm    - Q & A

Short Break

4.10pm – Keynote Lecture
   Prof. Frank Shovlin (Director of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool) - Prospecting for Gold: A Year with the McGahern Papers.
   Chair: Professor Dan Carey (Director, Moore Institute)

4.40pm – Q & A

4.55pm – Summary Comments – Barry Houlihan, Archivist (Hardiman Library)

Break

The Moore Institute and the Hardiman Library present:

5.30pm – Book launch – Dr. John Kenny (English)

                   Touchstones: John McGahern’s Classical Style by Prof. Frank Shovlin.

Touchstones examines the ways in which John McGahern became a writer through his reading. This reading, it is shown, was both extensive and intensive, and tended towards immersion in the classics. As such, new insights are provided into McGahern’s admiration and use of writers as diverse as Dante Alighieri, William Blake, James Joyce, Albert Camus and several others. Evidence for these claims is found both through close reading of McGahern’s published texts as well as unprecedented sleuthing in his extensive archive of papers held at the National University of Ireland, Galway. The ultimate intention of the book is to draw attention to the very literary and writerly nature of McGahern as an artist, and to place him, not just as a great Irish writer, but as part of a long and venerable European tradition.

The event is free, all welcome. For queries contact barry.houlihan@nuigalway.ie


Prof. Frank Shovlin